Transport Bill — Orders for possession of aerodromes, etc. — 9 May 2000

Mr Tony McNulty MP, Harrow East voted with the majority (Teller for the Noes).

(2) The Secretary of State may by order provide for--

(a) any aerodrome, and

(b) any aircraft, machinery, plant, material or thing found in or on any aerodrome,

to be taken into his possession and used by or for the purposes of the armed forces of the Crown.

(3) An order under this section may, for the purpose of securing compliance with the provisions of the order--

(a) provide for the detention of aircraft;

(b) make such other provision as appears to the Secretary of State to be necessary or expedient for securing such detention.

(4) A person must comply with an order under this section notwithstanding any other duty, however arising.

(5) An order under this section may, for the purpose of securing compliance with the provisions of the order, provide for--

(a) persons to be guilty of offences in such circumstances as may be specified in the order;

(b) persons to be liable on conviction of those offences to such penalties as may be so specified.

(6) The power under subsection (5) does not include power--

(a) to provide for offences to be triable only on indictment;

(b) to authorise the imposition, on summary conviction of an offence, of any term of imprisonment or of a fine exceeding the statutory maximum;

(c) to authorise the imposition, on conviction on indictment of an offence, of a term of imprisonment exceeding two years.

(7) Any person who suffers direct injury or loss arising from compliance with an order under this section is entitled to receive compensation from the Secretary of State.

(8) The compensation must be of an amount agreed by the person and the Secretary of State or (in default of agreement) of an amount decided by--

(a) an arbitrator appointed by the President of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (if the proceedings are to be held in England and Wales),

(b) an arbiter appointed by the Chairman of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors in Scotland (if the proceedings are to be held in Scotland), or

(c) an arbitrator appointed by the Lord Chancellor (if the proceedings are to be held in Northern Ireland).'.-- [Mr. Raynsford.]

Brought up, and read the First time.

I beg to move, That the clause be read a Second time.

Mr. Deputy Speaker:

With this it will be convenient to discuss the following: Amendment (a) to the proposed clause, at end of subsection (4) insert--

A person must comply with an order under the section notwithstanding any other duty, however arising.

To recognise the existence of such an exception, regardless of the specific requirements laid down by the Treaty, might impair the binding nature of Community law and its uniform application . . .

Furthermore, exceptions on the nature of public security are based in this case on derogations of four particular articles. The court has taken a progressively narrow view, over the years, on the way in which derogations should apply, especially if they run counter to the ethos of the market place or the single market.

the question is therefore whether, in the circumstances of the present case, the measures taken by the national authorities, in the exercise of the discretion which they are recognised to enjoy, do in fact have the purpose of guaranteeing public security and whether they are appropriate and necessary to achieve that aim.

in any time of actual or imminent hostilities or of severe international tension or of great national emergency.

Member states shall consult each other with a view to taking together the steps needed to prevent the functioning of the common market being affected by measures which a Member State may be called upon to take in the event of serious internal disturbances affecting the maintenance of law and order, in the event of war, serious international tension constituting a threat of war, or in order to carry out obligations it has accepted for the purpose of maintaining peace and international security.

a person who owns or operates a relevant asset.

That principle requires that derogations remain within the limits of what is appropriate and necessary.

in the exercise of any statutory power or duty, including any power to give directions, or to legislate by means of orders--

rules, regulations or other subordinate instrument, the person entrusted--

with the power or duty may have regard to the objects of the Communities and to any such obligation or rights as aforesaid.

This section applies in any time of actual or imminent hostilities or of severe international tension or of great national emergency.

to regulate or prohibit (absolutely or subject to conditions) the navigation of all or any descriptions of aircraft over the United Kingdom.

The Court of Justice shall give its ruling in camera.

to regulate or prohibit (absolutely or subject to conditions) the use, building, maintenance or establishment of aerodromes or flying schools or of any description of aerodrome or flying school.

A person must comply with an order under this section notwithstanding any other duty, however arising.

preserve the successful civil/military relationship that currently exists between NATS and the MOD and ensure that air traffic services are sustained on a joint and integrated basis, post PPP.

notwithstanding any other duty, however arising.

Member states to take measures they consider necessary for the protection of . . . their security which are connected with the defence sector. However, the Court of Justice pointed out that Article 223 covers only exceptional and clearly defined cases.

Because of its limited character, this article does not lend itself to a wide interpretation and it is not possible to infer from it that there is inherent in the Treaty a general proviso covering all measures taken for reasons of public security.

The provisions of Articles 28 and 29 shall not preclude prohibitions or restrictions on imports, exports or goods in transit justified on grounds of public morality, public policy or public security.

prohibitions or restrictions shall not, however, constitute a means of arbitrary discrimination or a disguised restriction on trade between Member States.

Question put and agreed to.

Clause read a Second time.

Amendment proposed to new clause 5 : (a), at end of subsection (4) insert--

Question put, That the amendment be made:--

The House divided: Ayes 136, Noes 405.

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Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con0 135 (+2 tell)085.6%
Lab356 (+2 tell) 0086.3%
LDem43 0091.5%
PC2 0050.0%
SNP4 0066.7%
UUP0 1011.1%
Total:405 136085.0%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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