Education Bill — Lords Amendment on Academies' Admissions Arrangements — 15 Jul 2002 at 21:45

Mr Richard Bacon MP, South Norfolk voted in the minority (No).

The majority Aye voters passed a House of Lords amendment[1] that would require academies to agree their admissions arrangements with other partners in the local area. This amendment relates to the Education Act 2002.

As David Miliband MP, in the debate on this amendment, explains[2]:

  • "Lords amendment No. 37 gives effect to our intention to require academies, formerly known as city academies, to take part in statutory admission forums and have regard to their advice—an obligation that we have included in their funding agreements. We have already put in place robust arrangements to ensure that academies will be inclusive schools, and that they will agree their admission arrangements in partnership with local education authorities and other admissions authorities."

The main aims of the Education Bill were to[3]:

  • Allow schools to exempt themselves from laws which prevented them from innovating. However, this is dependent on the Secretary of State's approval.
  • Give good schools the option of qualifying for greater flexibility in the National Curriculum and teachers' pay.
  • Allow schools to join together in a federation under a single governing body.
  • Further regulate school admissions, exclusions and attendance policies.
  • Give the Secretary of State further powers to intervene in failing schools.
  • Introduce a new regulatory regime for independent schools.

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Debate in Parliament | Historical Hansard | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Con0 128 (+2 tell)079.3%
DUP0 1020.0%
Lab312 (+2 tell) 0076.6%
LDem39 0073.6%
PC3 0075.0%
UUP0 3050.0%
Total:354 132076.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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