Lisbon Treaty — Government must report on the operation of European competition policy — rejected — 12 May 2008 at 18:22

Lord Avebury voted with the majority (Not-Content).

The majority Not-Contents rejected an amendment[1] to the European Union (Amendment) Bill. This would have prevented competition rules from being under the exclusive competence of the European Union (EU) unless the Secretary of State reported on the operation of EU competition policy to Parliament each year. In other words, this amendment sought to ensure that EU competition policy was still subject to parliamentary scrutiny. However, it was defeated.

In moving the amendment Lord Hunt of Wirral explains that:[2]

  • 'It is sad that, in the treaty, there is so little about the single market and helping us to achieve those open markets. There is plenty in the treaty about EU values, but nothing about what was, after all, a founding principle of the European Union.'

However, Baroness Ashton of Upholland argues that:[3]

  • 'The reason there has not been a change in terms of the single market in this amending treaty is because we believe that the arrangements and the rules that are staying in force are appropriate and good and there is no need to tinker with them. We believe that our access to the single market makes the UK such an attractive destination for investment. With that access comes certain common rules that are necessary for the functioning of the single market. Competition rules are among the most fundamental of such essential rules. As noble Lords will know, that does not mean that the whole area of competition law is an exclusive competence. The UK can, and does, set additional competition rules for other purposes that do not obstruct the operation of the EU's rules.'

The European Union (Amendment) Bill implements the Lisbon Treaty into UK law. The main aims of the Lisbon Treaty were to[4]:

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Not-Content)Minority (Content)Turnout
Con0 54 (+2 tell)27.3%
Ind Lab0 1100.0%
Lab104 (+2 tell) 048.4%
LDem38 048.7%
Other1 014.3%
UKIP0 2100.0%
Crossbench17 411.2%
Total:160 6132.2%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

Lords for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible lord who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Party | Vote

NamePartyVote
no rebellions

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