Government to sign up to 10:10 climate change campaign — rejected — 21 Oct 2009 at 18:53

The majority of MPs voted against the motion, which read:[1]

  • This House
  • believes that it is vital that the UK demonstrates political leadership at all levels in response to the climate crisis, and that this is particularly important ahead of the United Nations Climate Change summit in Copenhagen if there is to be an international agreement which will avert the worst effects of catastrophic climate change;
  • further believes that immediate practical responses to the crisis should include a massive expansion of renewable energy and energy efficiency and a commitment for all homes in Britain to be warm homes within 10 years;
  • acknowledges that action taken now to tackle the climate crisis will cost less than action taken in the future;
  • notes the declared support of Labour and Conservative frontbenchers to the objective of the 10:10 campaign which calls for 10% greenhouse gas emission reductions by the end of 2010;
  • agrees that the House will sign up to the 10:10 campaign;
  • calls on Her Majesty's Government and all public sector bodies now to make it their policy to achieve a 10% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by the end of 2010; and
  • further calls on the Government to bring a delivery plan before this House by the end of 2009 on how these objectives will be achieved.

In its place an alternative motion was proposed that only "welcomed" the Government's actions:[2]

  • This House
  • welcomes the 10:10 campaign as a motivator of public action to cut carbon dioxide emissions through individual and collective behaviour change;
  • recognises the value of such campaigns to build public support for action by governments to agree an ambitious, effective and fair deal at Copenhagen;
  • further recognises the significant effort made by individuals and organisations to cut their emissions through the 10:10 campaign;
  • supports the Climate Change Act 2008 introduced by this Government,[3] the first such legislation in the world, and the system of carbon budgets that enables Britain to set itself on a low carbon pathway;
  • notes that carbon budgets ensure active policies by Whitehall departments and the public sector that deliver long-term sustained emissions reductions not just in 2010 but through to 2022 and beyond;
  • further supports the efforts of local councils to move towards local carbon budgets by signing up to the 10:10 campaign;
  • further welcomes the allocation of up to £20 million for central Government departments to enable them to reduce further and faster carbon dioxide emissions from their operations, estate and transport; and
  • further welcomes the cross-cutting Public Value Programme review of the low carbon potential of the public sector, which will focus on how the sector can achieve transformational financial savings through value-for-money carbon reductions.

which passed without a further vote.

This vote was lost in spite of the fact that most of the front bench MPs have personally signed up to the campaign through public pressure.[4]

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con0 139072.0%
DUP1 4055.6%
Ind0 4066.7%
Lab296 (+2 tell) 12088.8%
LDem0 57 (+2 tell)093.7%
PC0 30100.0%
SDLP0 1033.3%
SNP0 6085.7%
Total:297 226083.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Sammy WilsonEast AntrimDUPno
Colin ChallenMorley and RothwellLabaye
Jeremy CorbynIslington NorthLabaye
David DrewStroudLabaye
Neil GerrardWalthamstowLabaye
Kate HoeyVauxhallLabaye
Kelvin HopkinsLuton NorthLabaye
Lynne JonesBirmingham, Selly OakLabaye
John McDonnellHayes and HarlingtonLabaye
Nick PalmerBroxtoweLabaye
Alan SimpsonNottingham SouthLabaye
David TaylorNorth West LeicestershireLabaye
Paul TruswellPudseyLabaye

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