University Tuition Fee Cap — Raise Upper Limit to £9,000 Per Year — 9 Dec 2010 at 17:12

Jonathan Djanogly MP, Huntingdon voted to raise the UK's undergraduate tuition fee cap to £9,000 per year.

The majority of MPs voted to raise the UK's undergraduate tuition fee cap to £9,000 per year.

The motion approved read:

Command paper Cm 7986 is a draft document which became The Higher Education (Higher Amount) (England) Regulations 2010.

The £9,000 "Higher Amount" is the maximum fee an institution can charge if it has a plan in place under section 33 of the 2004 Higher Education Act[3]. Such plans require institutions to set out how they are to promote awareness of financial and access arrangements for the course. Regulations may be introduced to require governing bodies to monitor their institutions' compliance with their plans.

Sections 30-38 of the 2004 Higher Education Act deal with plans, and their enforcement. The plans are approved and enforced in accordance with Section 34 of the Act, by the "Office for Fair Access" which calls the plans "access agreements"[4]. Access agreements can be viewed on the OfFA website[5].

Ministerial guidance as to the content of the plans has been issued.[6]

In the absence of such a plan institutions are only permitted to charge the "Basic Amount". This division was followed by another vote which set the "Basic Amount" at £6,000 per year.[7]

The £4,500 cap applies to final years and sandwich course years where there is a shorter than usual amount of attendance required at the institution.

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Alliance0 10100.0%
Con296 (+1 tell) 6099.0%
DUP0 7087.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Ind0 10100.0%
Lab0 253 (+2 tell)099.2%
LDem27 (+1 tell) 21086.0%
PC0 30100.0%
SDLP0 30100.0%
SNP0 60100.0%
Total:323 302097.8%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Philip DaviesShipleyConno
David DavisHaltemprice and HowdenConno
Julian LewisNew Forest EastConno
Jason McCartneyColne ValleyConno
Andrew PercyBrigg and GooleConno
Mark RecklessRochester and StroodConno
Annette BrookeMid Dorset and North PooleLDemno
Menzies CampbellNorth East FifeLDemno
Michael CrockartEdinburgh WestLDemno
Tim FarronWestmorland and LonsdaleLDemno
Andrew GeorgeSt IvesLDemno
Mike HancockPortsmouth SouthLDemno
Julian HuppertCambridgeLDemno
Charles KennedyRoss, Skye and LochaberLDemno
John LeechManchester, WithingtonLDemno
Stephen LloydEastbourneLDemno
Greg MulhollandLeeds North WestLDemno
John PughSouthportLDemno
Alan ReidArgyll and ButeLDemno
Dan RogersonNorth CornwallLDemno
Bob RussellColchesterLDemno
Adrian SandersTorbayLDemno
Ian SwalesRedcarLDemno
Mark WilliamsCeredigionLDemno
Roger WilliamsBrecon and RadnorshireLDemno
Jennifer WillottCardiff CentralLDemno
Simon WrightNorwich SouthLDemno

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