Opposition Day — Fuel Prices and the Cost of Living — 16 Mar 2011 at 16:00

Jamie Reed MP, Copeland voted against noting the Government's position in respect of fuel prices and the cost of living.

The majority of MPs voted to note the Government's position in respect of fuel prices and the cost of living.

The text of the approved motion was:

  • That this House:
  • notes that the Government inherited the largest deficit in UK peacetime history and that the previous Government and current Opposition has no credible plan to deal with the deficit;
  • further notes that this Government has already taken steps to support families and that those on low and middle incomes will benefit from April 2011 from a £1,000 increase in the income tax personal allowance, above-indexation increases in Child Tax Credit and that pensioners will receive new ‘triple-lock’ increases in the basic State Pension;
  • further notes the significant impact on fuel prices in the UK of the dramatic increase in the world oil price to over $100 per barrel and the impact on households and business;
  • notes that the previous Government increased fuel duty no less than four times between December 2008 and April 2010, proposed introducing a fuel escalator from 2011 and planned for a further series of six consecutive fuel duty rises up to 2014;
  • nonetheless recognises the significant impact of high fuel prices on motorists, hauliers and businesses and that the Government is considering a fair fuel stabiliser that could support motorists and businesses when oil prices are high; and
  • in addition notes that a reduction in VAT on fuel would be deemed illegal under EU law and that the Chancellor will update the House on this issue at the time of the Budget.’.

There is nothing substantive within the agreed motion, it is merely noting and "recognising" things rather than requiring any action.

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Con263 (+2 tell) 0086.6%
DUP0 3037.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Ind0 10100.0%
Lab0 223 (+2 tell)087.2%
LDem44 0077.2%
PC0 30100.0%
SDLP0 2066.7%
SNP0 60100.0%
Total:307 239085.5%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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