Welfare Reform Bill — New Clause 2 — Childcare Element in Universal Credit — 13 Jun 2011 at 20:15

Stephen Mosley MP, City of Chester voted against introducing a childcare element to Universal Credit.

The majority of MPs voted against a proposal to introduce a childcare element, for those in work, of Universal Credit.

The rejected new clause on childcare was moved by MP Stephen Timms (Labour MP, East Ham) it read:

  • (1) The amount in respect of other particular needs or circumstance, under section 12, shall include a childcare element for claimants who are in work, except in prescribed circumstances.
  • (2) The maximum award of the childcare element shall be a prescribed proportion of childcare costs (not less than 80%, or 90% where the element contributes to care for a disabled child), up to a prescribed maximum value (not less than £175 per week for one child and £300 for two or more children).
  • (3) “Childcare charges” are charges of a prescribed description incurred in respect of childcare by the claimant or claimants by whom a universal credit claim is made.
  • (4) “Childcare”, in relation to a person or persons, means care provided for any child up to the last day in the week in which 1 September falls following the child’s 15th birthday or their 16th birthday if they are disabled, for whom the person is responsible, or for whom either or both of the persons is or are responsible; and by a person of a prescribed description.
  • (5) Except in prescribed circumstances, the childcare element shall not be paid where a claimant is in work for fewer than a prescribed number of hours a week or, in the case of a couple, where one or both of the claimants are in work for fewer than a prescribed number of hours a week.
  • (6) For the purposes of this section, regulations are to provide for a definition of “work.”’

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Alliance0 10100.0%
Con245 (+2 tell) 0080.7%
DUP0 1012.5%
Lab0 204 (+2 tell)080.2%
LDem48 0084.2%
PC0 30100.0%
SDLP0 2066.7%
SNP0 5083.3%
Total:293 216080.0%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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