European Union Bill — Mechanism of EU Law Taking Effect in the UK — 15 Jun 2011 at 16:47

Lord Rennard voted to state EU law takes effect in the UK via via "an Act of Parliament" rather than specifically saying it does so via the European Communities Act 1972.

The majority of Lords voted to state EU law takes effect in the UK via the European Communities Act 1972; rather than stating it does so via "an Act of Parliament".

The House of Lords was considering the European Union Bill[1]. The amendment which was accepted by the majority of Lords in this vote was:

Amendment 33: Clause 18, leave out Clause 18 and insert the following new Clause-

  • "Status of EU law dependent on continuing statutory basis
  • By virtue of the European Communities Act 1972 directly applicable or directly effective EU law (that is, the rights, powers, liabilities, obligations, restrictions, remedies and procedures referred to in section 2(1) of the European Communities Act 1972) falls to be recognised and available in law in the United Kingdom."

The original clause 18[2] stated:

  • Status of EU law dependent on continuing statutory basis
  • It is only by virtue of an Act of Parliament that directly applicable or directly effective EU law (that is, the rights, powers, liabilities, obligations, restrictions, remedies and procedures referred to in section 2(1) of the European Communities Act 1972) falls to be recognised and available in law in the United Kingdom.

During debate, member of the House of Lords, James Mackay (styled Lord Mackay of Clashfern) explained the purpose of the amendment:

  • I do not think that the Government intended any sinister meaning, but they have used an extraordinary shorthand in saying "an Act" when apparently they meant a list of Acts. It is much clearer and more effective to alter "an Act" to the Act that we know is responsible; namely, the 1972 Act.

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Content)Minority (Not-Content)Turnout
Bishop3 116.7%
Con5 130 (+1 tell)59.9%
DUP2 050.0%
Ind Lab1 0100.0%
Lab164 (+1 tell) 065.2%
LDem9 (+1 tell) 59 (+1 tell)70.7%
Other1 025.0%
PC1 0100.0%
UKIP0 2100.0%
UUP1 3100.0%
Crossbench53 1233.9%
Total:240 20755.6%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

Lords for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible lord who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Party | Vote

NamePartyVote
The Bishop of Ripon and LeedsBishopno
Lord Deben Conaye
Baroness Hooper Conaye
Lord Mackay of ClashfernConaye
Lord Plumb Conaye
Lord Tebbit Conaye
Lord Dykes LDemtellaye
Lord Goodhart LDemaye
Lord Lester of Herne HillLDemaye
Lord Maclennan of RogartLDemaye
Lord Oakeshott of Seagrove BayLDemaye
Lord Rodgers of Quarry BankLDemaye
Lord Taverne LDemaye
Baroness Tonge LDemaye
Lord Tordoff LDemaye
Baroness Williams of CrosbyLDemaye
Lord Laird UUPaye

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