Opposition Day — The Economy — 22 Jun 2011 at 18:50

Jon Trickett MP, Hemsworth voted to reduce the deficit over a longer period, to cut VAT to 17.5%, to repeat the 2010 bank bonus tax, to build 25,000 affordable homes and create 100,000 jobs for young people.

The majority of MPs voted against Labour proposals to reduce the deficit over a longer period, to cut VAT to 17.5%, to repeat the 2010 bank bonus tax, to build 25,000 affordable homes and create 100,000 jobs for young people.

Labour Shadow Chancellor, Ed Balls, proposed the motion, which was rejected, saying:

  • That this House
  • notes that on 22 June 2010 the Chancellor announced his first Budget with a target to eliminate the structural deficit by 2015-16 through an additional £40 billion of spending cuts and tax rises, including a VAT rise;
  • further notes that over the last six months the economy has not grown, in the last month retail sales fell by 1.4 per cent. and manufacturing output fell by 1.5 per cent. and despite a welcome recent fall in unemployment, the Office for Budget Responsibility predicts that future unemployment will be up to 200,000 higher than expected;
  • believes the Government’s policies to cut the deficit too far and too fast have led to slower growth, higher inflation and higher unemployment, which are creating a vicious circle, since the Government is now set to borrow £46 billion more than previously forecast;
  • calls on the Government to adopt a more balanced deficit plan which, alongside tough decisions on tax and spending cuts, puts jobs first and will be a better way to get the deficit down over the longer term and avoid long-term damage to the economy; and,
  • if the Government will not change course and halve the deficit over four years, demands that it should take a step in the right direction by temporarily cutting VAT to 17.5 per cent. until the economy returns to strong growth and by using funds raised from repeating the 2010 bank bonus tax to build 25,000 affordable homes and create 100,000 jobs for young people.

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Alliance1 00100.0%
Con257 (+1 tell) 0084.3%
DUP0 2025.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Lab0 202 (+2 tell)079.4%
LDem47 (+1 tell) 0084.2%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 1033.3%
Total:305 208081.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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