Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Bill — Schedule 8 — Length of Transtional Period During Which Existing Control Orders Remain In Place — 29 Nov 2011 at 16:30

Nick Herbert MP, Arundel and South Downs voted against Control Orders in place when the Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Bill comes into force remaining in place for 365 days, rather than 42 days, unless revoked or quashed.

The majority of MPs voted against Control Orders in place when the Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Bill comes into force remaining in place for 365 days, rather than 42 days, unless revoked or quashed.

MPs were considering the Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Bill[1]. The amendment rejected in this vote was:

  • Amendment (a) to Lords amendment 11.

Lords amendment 11[2] stated:

  • Page 55, line 26, leave out “28” and insert “42”

Amendment (a)[3] stated:

  • Line 1, leave out ‘42’ and insert ‘365’.

The amendments relate to Schedule 8 of the Bill[4] which at the time of the vote defined the "transitional period" as follows:

  • “transitional period” means the period of 28 days that begins with the

day of commencement.

Paragraph 1 of Schedule 8 stated:

  • A Control Order which is in force immediately before commencement is to remain in force until the end of the transitional period (unless revoked or quashed before the end of that period).

Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (TPIMs) replaced Control Orders and are a civil preventative measure intended to protect the public from the risk posed by suspected terrorists who can be neither prosecuted nor, in the case of foreign nationals, deported, by imposing restrictions intended to prevent or disrupt their engagement in terrorism-related activity.[5]

The threshold for the imposition of a TPIM is "reasonable belief that the individual is or has been involved in terrorism-related activity" which is considered a higher threshold than that required previously for a control order which was "reasonable suspicion" of involvement in such activity.

TPIMs are subject to a two-year time limit and oversight by the courts.

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Alliance1 00100.0%
Con246 (+1 tell) 0080.7%
DUP4 0050.0%
Green1 00100.0%
Lab3 203 (+2 tell)080.9%
LDem41 (+1 tell) 0073.7%
PC3 00100.0%
SDLP2 01100.0%
SNP4 0066.7%
Total:305 203179.9%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Jeremy CorbynIslington NorthLabno
John McDonnellHayes and HarlingtonLabno
Dennis SkinnerBolsoverLabno
Margaret RitchieSouth DownSDLPboth

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