Finance Bill — Clause 1 — Additional Rate of Income Tax — 18 Apr 2012 at 15:50

Owen Smith MP, Pontypridd voted to abolish the additional rate of income tax applying to income over £150,000 per year

The majority of MPs voted to set the additional rate of income tax, applying to income over £150,000 per year, at 45% for 2013-14 (a reduction from the previous rate of 50%).

MPs were considering the Finance Bill when they voted on:

amendment 1, page 2, line 4, leave out paragraph (c).

The paragraph (c) in question was in clause 1 of the Finance Bill[1][2] and set the additional rate of income tax for 2013-14 at 45%. Had the paragraph been removed there would have been no additional rate of income tax for 2013-14.

The MP who moved the amendment, Owen Smith, stated during debate[3]:

  • A tax cut for millionaires—£40,000 for 14,000 millionaires, signed away in one short line, in subsection (2)(c), which cuts the additional top rate of tax from 50p to 45p. Let me be clear: our amendment would get rid of that provision. It would do what we as the Opposition are able to do and strike out from the Bill the change from 50p to 45p. Let there be no doubt whatever: we will be voting to remove paragraph (c) later today.

The Finance Bill was not amending the previous rates of income tax, but setting them for 2013-14 so the effect of Owen Smith MP's amendment would have been to reduce the additional top rate of income tax from 50% to 0%.

At the time of the vote the additional rate was 50% charged on income over £150,000 per year, as it had been since the additional rate had been introduced in 2010-11[4][5]. The Finance Bill contained a provision to set the rate at 45% for 2013-14.

Had the amendment passed the intent of the mover, and the intent of the House of Commons may have been taken into account and further amendments to effect that intent may have been moved.

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Alliance0 10100.0%
Con277 (+1 tell) 0191.2%
DUP0 80100.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Ind0 10100.0%
Lab0 232 (+2 tell)091.1%
LDem44 (+1 tell) 0180.7%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 30100.0%
SNP0 60100.0%
Total:321 254290.4%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Jason McCartneyColne ValleyConboth
Mike HancockPortsmouth SouthLDemboth

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