Energy Bill — Decline Second Reading — 19 Dec 2012 at 18:50

Oliver Letwin MP, West Dorset voted to reform the energy market with regard to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, securing supply, affordability for consumers and increasing generation from renewable sources.

The majority of MPs voted to approve the major principles in the Energy Bill and to allow the Bill to continue on its path to becoming law.

The key elements of the Bill are:

  • Reform of the energy market with "regard" to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, securing supply, considering costs to consumers and an EU target of 15% of UK energy to be supplied from renewable sources by 2020.
  • To give the Secretary of State the power to subsidise electricity generation using renewable, nuclear and carbon capture and storage technologies.
  • To set out the role of the Office for Nuclear Regulation.
  • To make provisions relating to the operation of the government pipe-line and storage system.
  • To introduce "consumer redress orders" to provide redress to consumers who suffer loss, damage or inconvenience as a result of a breach licence conditions or other relevant regulatory requirement.
  • To enable the state to charge prospective nuclear operators for work related to assessing submitted "funded decommissioning programmes".

The motion rejected in this vote was:

  • That this House, whilst affirming its support for measures included in the Bill to reform the electricity market to deliver secure, clean and affordable electricity, declines to give a Second Reading to the Energy Bill because it fails to include a clear target to decarbonise the power sector by 2030, and because it fails to include direct measures to increase transparency, competition or liquidity or ensure that the energy market is properly regulated and works in the interests of consumers.

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con236 (+1 tell) 0077.7%
DUP1 0012.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Lab0 203 (+2 tell)079.5%
LDem42 (+1 tell) 0075.4%
PC0 1033.3%
Respect0 10100.0%
Total:279 206077.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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