Welfare Benefits Up-rating Bill — Clauses 1 to 3 and Schedule — Capping Increase of Specified Benefits at 1% — 21 Jan 2013 at 20:45

Theresa May MP, Maidenhead voted to cap any increase in specified benefits payments and tax credits at 1% rather allow them to be increased by 2.2% in line with prices.

The majority of MPs voted to cap any increase in specified benefits payments and tax credits at 1% rather than allow them to be increased by 2.2% in line with prices.

MPs were considering the Welfare Benefits Up-rating Bill. The motion voted on read:

  • That clauses 1 to 3 stand part of the Bill; and that the schedule be the schedule to the Bill.

Clauses 1 to 3 and the schedule amount to the whole Bill.[1] A vote in favour of this motion was a vote in favour of the whole bill.

The explanatory notes to the bill[2] explain its purpose:

  • In the Autumn Statement, it was announced that in light of the national economic situation, certain working-age social security benefits and payments, and certain elements of tax credits, would be up-rated by 1 percent, rather than prices (as measured by the Consumer Prices Index (‘CPI’), 2.2 per cent), for the tax year 2013-14.
  • The working-age social security benefits and payments in question are:
  • The main rates of Income Support, Jobseeker’s Allowance, Employment and Support Allowance and Housing Benefit; and the work-related activity group component of Employment and Support Allowance Maternity Allowance; and Statutory Adoption, Maternity, Paternity and Sick Pay .

This vote was required as a result of a requirement in the agreed timetable (which was the subject of a vote on the 8th of January 2013) which required the business to be concluded. It was followed by a vote on the third reading of the Welfare Benefits Up-rating Bill

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Alliance0 10100.0%
Con272 (+1 tell) 0089.5%
DUP0 2025.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Lab0 223 (+2 tell)087.2%
LDem35 (+1 tell) 5071.9%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 30100.0%
SNP0 60100.0%
Total:307 243086.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Andrew GeorgeSt IvesLDem (front bench)no
Martin HorwoodCheltenhamLDemno
Julian HuppertCambridgeLDem (front bench)no
Charles KennedyRoss, Skye and LochaberLDem (front bench)no
Alan ReidArgyll and ButeLDem (front bench)no

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