Opposition Day — Jobs — Capital Investment — Mansion Tax — Income Tax — Rail Fares — Energy Bills — Private Tenants — Pensions — Payday Loans — Banking, Planning and Skills Reforms — 4 Sep 2013 at 16:22

John Baron MP, Basildon and Billericay did not vote.

The majority of MPs voted against calling on the government to get more people into work, bring forward capital investment, introduce a compulsory jobs guarantee, reintroduce a 10% rate of income tax paid for by a mansion tax, act on "rip off" rail fares and soaring energy costs, stand up for families in the private rented sector, reform pensions, curb payday lenders, and reform banking, planning and the skills system.

The text of the rejected motion was:

  • That this House
  • believes that the Government is failing to turn things around for the UK’s hard working families;
  • notes that this has been the slowest economic recovery on record, and that the Government is out of touch with the difficulties faced by ordinary families;
  • recognises that average earnings are almost £1,500 a year lower in real terms than they were in 2010;
  • notes in addition that tax and benefit changes since 2010 are costing families an average of £891 in 2013-14 according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies;
  • further notes that the Government is making hard-working families pay more than their share to bring down the deficit while cutting income tax by an average of £100,000 for the 13,000 people with incomes over £1 million; and
  • calls on the Government to ensure that the recovery is strengthened, sustainable and its benefits fairly shared by getting more people into work, bringing forward capital investment, as recommended by the IMF, introducing a compulsory jobs guarantee, backing fair taxes by reintroducing a 10p rate of income tax, paid for by a mansion tax on houses worth over £2 million, taking action on rip-off rail fares and soaring energy bills, standing up for families in the private rented sector, reforming the pensions industry, curbing payday lenders and implementing long-term reforms to banking, infrastructure planning and the skills system.

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Alliance0 10100.0%
Con252 (+1 tell) 0083.0%
DUP1 4062.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Lab0 211 (+2 tell)082.6%
LDem36 (+1 tell) 0066.1%
PC0 1033.3%
SDLP0 2066.7%
SNP0 5083.3%
Total:289 225080.8%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Sammy WilsonEast AntrimDUP (front bench)no

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