Opposition Day — Employment Rights — Strategy for Creating Higher Skilled Better Paid Jobs — 5 Feb 2014 at 18:48

Julian Huppert MP, Cambridge voted against strengthening employment rights and against calling on the Government to adopt a strategy for creating more high-skilled, better paid jobs.

The majority of MPs voted against strengthening employment rights and against calling on the Government to adopt a strategy for creating more high-skilled, better paid jobs.

The text of the motion rejected in the vote was:

  • That this House
  • believes that insecurity at work has increased under this Government, compounding the cost of living crisis facing families;
  • further believes that the Government’s policies have made life less secure for people at work by watering down their rights, including protections against unfair dismissal and by abandoning an evidence-based approach to health and safety;
  • notes that the number of employees working part-time who want to work full-time has grown by over 350,000 since the Government took office to over 1.4 million, alongside a marked rise in zero-hours contracts;
  • recognises that insecure jobs add to pressure on the social security budget by making it harder for people to buy a home or save for their own pension;
  • calls on the Government to reverse the trend of rising insecurity at work by reforming zero-hours contracts so they are not exploitative, addressing false self-employment by closing loopholes which allow it to take place, scrapping the failed ‘shares for rights’ scheme, strengthening and properly enforcing the National Minimum Wage, including by increasing fines to £50,000 and giving local authorities enforcement powers, and incentivising employers to pay a Living Wage through ‘make work pay’ contracts; and
  • further calls on the Government to adopt a proper industrial strategy to help create more high-skilled, better paid jobs so the UK can earn its way out of the cost of living crisis with stronger and better-balanced growth.

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con243 (+1 tell) 0080.0%
DUP0 3037.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Lab0 211 (+2 tell)082.9%
LDem43 (+1 tell) 0078.6%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 1033.3%
SNP0 5083.3%
Total:286 223080.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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