Housing Benefit and Universal Credit — Regular Payments and Penalty for Excess Bedrooms — 12 Feb 2014 at 13:36

John Penrose MP, Weston-Super-Mare did not vote.

The majority of MPs voted against a financial penalty for those receiving housing related benefits on the basis of the number of bedrooms they have. The majority of MPs also voted in favour of housing related benefits being paid at regular intervals.

The vote was on if Ian Lavery MP (Wansbeck, Labour) would be permitted to bring in a Bill; the proposal was made under "ten minute rule"; a slot in the Commons timetable where MPs get ten minutes to propose a new Bill they'd like to bring in (and there's an opportunity for one ten minute speech in opposition).

The text of the rejected motion was:

  • That leave be given to bring in a Bill to establish the right of persons in receipt of housing benefit and universal credit in the social housing sector to receive said benefits at regular intervals;to provide that such persons should not be financially penalised in relation to the number of bedrooms in a residence; and for connected purposes.

Details of the full text of the Bill are not generally available at this stage and MPs are voting based on the description of the Bill and following the speech made by the MP proposing it.

The Bill will now be "prepared", there are many further stages for it to go though in Parliament before it becomes law.

Cambridge MP Julian Huppert tweeted[1] following the vote to say:

  • "Labour engineered a vote by shouting against their own motion, otherwise it would have passed with no vote."

MP Chris Bryant raised a point of order following the vote during which he said:

  • the Tory Whips were standing outside the Chamber during the Division and persuading Conservative Members not to vote, so we on the Opposition side of the House hope that that means that they have changed their minds and will get rid of the bedroom tax as soon as possible. If they will not, we will.

==

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Con2 101.0%
DUP8 00100.0%
Green1 00100.0%
Independent1 0050.0%
Lab200 (+2 tell) 0 (+2 tell)079.4%
LDem5 008.9%
PC2 0066.7%
Respect1 00100.0%
SDLP3 00100.0%
SNP2 0033.3%
Total:225 1035.8%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
David NuttallBury NorthCon (front bench)no
Heidi AlexanderLewisham EastLab (minister)tellno
Tom BlenkinsopMiddlesbrough South and East ClevelandLab (minister)tellno

About the Project

The Public Whip is a not-for-profit, open source website created in 2003 by Francis Irving and Julian Todd and now run by Bairwell Ltd.

There are lots of plans afoot, including extensive redevelopment of the site and plans for new functionality. To keep up with what's happening, please check out the blog. We're working on updating all the contact details throughout the site, but if you'd like to talk to us about the project, please email [email protected]

The Whip on the Web

Advertisement - Helping keeping PublicWhip alive