Care Bill — New Clause 27 — New Offence Relating to Abuse and Neglect of Those Receiving Care — 10 Mar 2014 at 20:45

John Baron MP, Basildon and Billericay voted against making it an offence for care providers to manage or organise their activities in a manner leading to, or creating the possibility of, abuse or neglect occurring; and also against requiring care providers to investigate and report suspected risks of, or actual, abuse or neglect of those in their care.

The majority of MPs voted against making it an offence for care providers to manage or organise their activities in a manner leading to, or creating the possibility of, abuse or neglect occurring. The majority of MPs also voted against requiring care providers to investigate and report suspected risks of, or actual, abuse or neglect of those in their care.

MPs were considering the Care Bill[1]. The proposed new clause rejected in this vote was:

  • (1) This section applies where a person registered under Chapter 2 of Part 1 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (a “registered care provider”) in respect of the carrying on of a regulated activity (within the meaning of that Part) has reasonable cause to suspect that an adult in their care is experiencing, or at risk of, abuse and neglect.
  • (2) The registered care provider must make (or cause to be made) whatever enquiries it thinks necessary to enable it to decide whether any action should be taken in the adult’s case and, if so, what and by whom.
  • (3) Where abuse or neglect is suspected, the registered care provider is responsible for informing the Safeguarding Adults Board in its area and commits an offence if (without reasonable cause) it fails to do so.
  • (4) A registered care provider is guilty of an offence if the way in which its activities are managed or organised by its board or senior management neglects, or is a substantial element in, the existence and or possibility of abuse or neglect occurring.
  • (5) A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable on conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or to a fine, the range of which will be specified by regulations, or to both.’.

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con223 (+1 tell) 1073.8%
DUP0 3037.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Lab0 209 (+2 tell)081.8%
LDem42 (+1 tell) 1078.6%
PC0 2066.7%
Total:265 217077.0%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Charlotte LeslieBristol North WestCon (front bench)aye
Paul BurstowSutton and CheamLDemaye

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