Opposition Day — Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Welfare Reform (Disabled People) — 28 Oct 2014 at 16:00

John Baron MP, Basildon and Billericay voted against calling for David Freud to be dismissed as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Welfare Reform.

The majority of MPs voted to support the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Welfare Reform, David Anthony Freud ("Lord Freud") remaining in his role and against a motion of no-confidence in him.

This vote followed reported statements from Freud saying[1]:

"You make a really good point about the disabled ... There is a group - and I know exactly who you mean - where actually, as you say, they're not worth the full wage and actually I'm going to go and think about that particular issue, whether there is something we can do nationally, and without distorting the whole thing, which actually if someone wants to work for £2 an hour, and it's working can we actually..."

The motion rejected by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That this House
  • notes the comments of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Welfare Reform, Lord Freud, on 30 September 2014 that the work of disabled people is not worth the minimum wage;
  • believes that these comments have further undermined trust among disabled people in this Government’s policies, a trust which had already been damaged by delays in assessments for a personal independence payment, problems with work capability assessments, and the poor performance of policies aimed at helping disabled people into work;
  • further notes that the conduct of Lord Freud had already damaged that trust through his oversight of the housing benefit social sector size criteria which has had a particularly severe impact on disabled people, many of whom have nowhere else to move to and need extra room for medical equipment or carers; and
  • therefore concludes that this House has no confidence in the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Welfare Reform; and
  • calls on the Prime Minister to dismiss him.

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con261 (+1 tell) 0086.5%
DUP0 4050.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent1 10100.0%
Lab0 227 (+2 tell)088.8%
LDem40 (+1 tell) 0073.2%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 2066.7%
SNP0 60100.0%
Total:302 243085.8%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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