Opposition Day — The Economy — Minimum Wage — Childcare — Business Rates — Infrastructure — Building New Homes — 26 Nov 2014 at 15:49

Julian Huppert MP, Cambridge voted against the minimum wage being a higher proportion of average earnings; against more free childcare for working parents; against a cut in business rates for small firms; against an independent infrastructure commission; and against the building of 200,000 new homes a year.

The majority of MPs voted against the minimum wage being a higher proportion of average earnings; against more free childcare for working parents; against a cut in business rates for small firms; against an independent infrastructure commission; and against the building of 200,000 new homes a year.

The motion rejected by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That this House
  • believes the Government has failed to deliver rising living standards and a recovery that works for the many, with working people on average £1,600 a year worse off since 2010;
  • notes that the Office for Budget Responsibility has said that stagnant wages and too many low-paid jobs are leading to lower tax revenues and more borrowing, with the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s pledge to balance the books by 2015 set to be broken;
  • calls on the Government to bring forward a plan in the Autumn Statement to deliver a recovery for the many, not just a few at the top, with proposals for a minimum wage rising as a proportion of average earnings, an expansion of free childcare for working parents, a cut in business rates for small firms, an independent infrastructure commission, and the building of 200,000 new homes a year;
  • believes that a tough and fair plan to deliver a current budget surplus and falling national debt as soon as possible in the next Parliament would include reversing the Government’s £3 billion a year tax cut for the top one per cent of earners and introducing tougher measures to tackle tax avoidance; and
  • further believes that the Autumn Statement should use £1 billion of fines from the recent foreign exchange manipulation scandal for an immediate boost to health and care, and announce a £2.5 billion a year fund to help save and transform the NHS, including funding for an extra 20,000 nurses and 8,000 GPs.

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con265 (+2 tell) 0088.1%
DUP0 4050.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent1 10100.0%
Lab0 225 (+2 tell)088.0%
LDem47 0083.9%
PC0 30100.0%
SNP0 5083.3%
Total:313 239087.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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