Onshore Hydraulic Fracturing (Protected Areas) Regulations 2015 — Extension of Prohibition of Shale Gas Extraction — 16 Dec 2015 at 19:30

Anna Soubry MP, Broxtowe voted for greater restrictions on hydraulic fracturing (fracking) to extract shale gas in National Parks, the Broads, areas of outstanding natural beauty, World Heritage sites, and near points where water is abstracted for domestic and food production purposes.

The majority of MPs voted to extend the ban on hydraulic fracturing (fracking) to extract shale gas within 1000m of the surface to within 1200m of the surface in National Parks, the Broads, areas of outstanding natural beauty, World Heritage sites, and near points where water is abstracted for domestic and food production purposes.

The motion supported by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

The regulations define “protected groundwater source areas” and “other protected areas” where hydraulic fracturing (fracking) to extract shale gas is prohibited.[1]

The protected areas set out in the regulations are defined as land less than 1200m below the surface within :

  • a National Park;
  • the Broads;
  • an area of outstanding natural beauty; or
  • a World Heritage site.

As well as land less than 1200m below the surface within :

  • 50 metres, or 50 day travel time for groundwater, of a point at the surface at which water is abstracted from underground strata and is used to supply water for domestic or food production purposes

The definitions provided by the regulations are for the purpose of applying Section 4A of the Petroleum Act 1988 which was introduced via Section 50 of the Infrastructure Act 2015[2]. Section 4A already prohibited onshore hydraulic fracturing from taking place in land at a depth of less than 1000 metres.

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Con296 4090.9%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent0 2066.7%
Lab1 192083.2%
LDem0 7087.5%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 2066.7%
SNP0 49090.7%
UKIP1 00100.0%
UUP0 20100.0%
Total:298 261087.8%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Zac GoldsmithRichmond ParkCon (front bench)no
Jason McCartneyColne ValleyCon (front bench)no
Andrew TurnerIsle of WightCon (front bench)no
Sarah WollastonTotnesCon (front bench)no
Jim FitzpatrickPoplar and LimehouseLab (minister)aye

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