Energy Bill — New Clause 10 — United Kingdom Carbon Account — Consideration of Emissions Traded via European Union Emissions Trading Scheme — 14 Mar 2016 at 19:30

John Penrose MP, Weston-Super-Mare voted to take account of carbon dioxide emissions traded via the European Union to Emissions Trading Scheme when calculating the state of the UK carbon account for periods from 2028.

The majority of MPs voted to take account of carbon dioxide emissions traded via the European Union to Emissions Trading Scheme when calculating the state of the UK carbon account for periods from 2028.

MPs were considering the Energy Bill.[1]

The proposed new clause rejected in this vote was titled:Emissions trading: United Kingdom carbon account and stated:

Speaking during the debate Alan Whitehead MP (Labour) the Shadow Minister for Energy and Climate Change explained the intent of the new clause saying:[2]

  • This new clause seeks a slightly different route to the goal of more effective carbon accounting in the fifth carbon budget and beyond. It seeks to make the Government directly accountable for emissions in the sectors covered by the EU emission trading system when determining whether the UK is staying within its national carbon budgets. The EU ETS covers emissions in the electricity sector and heavy industry, and the carbon accounting regulations currently allow the Government to ignore emissions from those sectors when determining whether the carbon budgets have been met.

Section 11 of the Climate Change Act 2008 required a Secretary of State to set a limit on the net amount of carbon units that may be credited to the net UK carbon account for each budgetary period, Section 27 of that Act provides details of how the net amount of carbon units emitted is to be calculated.

Debate in Parliament | Source |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con275 (+2 tell) 0083.9%
DUP0 2025.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent0 1033.3%
Lab0 175 (+2 tell)076.6%
LDem0 1012.5%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 2066.7%
SNP0 44081.5%
Total:275 228079.1%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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