Housing and Planning Bill — New Clause — Permitted Carbon Dixoide Emission Rate for New Homes — 3 May 2016 at 22:00

Patrick McLoughlin MP, Derbyshire Dales did not vote.

The majority of MPs voted not to reduce the permitted carbon dioxide emission rate of new homes.

MPs were considering the Housing and Planning Bill[1].

The motion supported by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That this House disagrees with Lords amendment 108

Lords amendment 108[2] sought to introduce a new clause titled Carbon compliance standard for new homes which stated:

  • (1) The Secretary of State must within one year of the passing of this Act make regulations under section 1(1) of the Building Act 1984 (power to make building regulations) for the purpose of ensuring that all new homes in England built from 1 April 2018 achieve the carbon compliance standard.
  • (2) For the purpose of subsection (1), “carbon compliance standard” means an improvement on the target carbon dioxide emission rate, as set out in the Building Regulations 2006, of—
  • (a) 60% in the case of detached houses;
  • (b) 56% in the case of attached houses; and
  • (c) 44% in the case of flats.

The explanatory notes to the amendments[3] state "improvement" is considered to be a percentage reduction in the target carbon dioxide emission rate.

Regulation 15 of The Building and Approved Inspectors (Amendment) Regulations 2006 amended Building Regulations 2000 to introduce a requirement that The Secretary of State shall approve minimum energy performance requirements for new buildings, in the form of target CO2 emission rates. The procedure for calculating the target emission rate in 2006 was set out in paragraphs 19 to 23 of The Building Regulations 2000 Approved Document L1A Conservation of fuel and power and depends on factors such as size, shape and the type of fuel used for heating.

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Debate in Parliament |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Con285 (+2 tell) 0087.0%
DUP1 0012.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent0 1033.3%
Lab0 154 (+2 tell)067.8%
LDem0 6075.0%
PC0 1033.3%
Total:286 163077.7%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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