Policing and Crime Bill — Police Complaints and the Media — Independent Inquiry — 13 Jun 2016 at 19:20

The majority of MPs voted against an independent inquiry into the operation of the police complaints system in respect of relationships between the police and media.

MPs were considering the Policing and Crime Bill.[1]

The proposed new clause rejected in this vote was titled Police complaints and the media and stated:

  • ‘(1) Subject to subsection (3), the Prime Minister must commission an independent inquiry into the operation of the police complaints system in respect of relationships between the police and media.
  • (2) The inquiry must include, but is not limited, to—
  • (a) how adequately police forces investigated complaints about police officers in dealing with people working within, or connected to, media organisations,
  • (b) the thoroughness of any reviews by police forces into complaints specified in subsection (a),
  • (c) in the cases where a complaint in subsection (a) led to a criminal investigation, the conduct of prosecuting authorities in investigating the allegation,
  • (d) the extent to which police officers took illegal payment to suppress investigations of complaints of relationships between police officers and people working within, or connected to, media organisations,
  • (e) the implications of subsections (a) to (d) for the relationships between media organisations and the police, prosecuting authorities, and relevant regulatory bodies, and recommended actions.
  • (3) The inquiry can only commence once the Secretary of State is satisfied that it would not prejudice any ongoing relevant legal cases.

The rejected new clause was accompanied by an explanatory statement saying:

  • This new clause would compel the Prime Minister to instigate an independent inquiry such as Leveson 2 into the relationships between the press and police and the extent to which that has operated in the public interest.

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Debate in Parliament |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con263 (+2 tell) 1080.6%
DUP3 0037.5%
Independent0 1033.3%
Lab0 141 (+2 tell)061.9%
LDem0 5062.5%
PC0 30100.0%
SDLP0 2066.7%
UUP0 02100.0%
Total:266 153272.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Jason McCartneyColne ValleyCon (front bench)aye

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