European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill — Decline Second Reading — 1 Feb 2017 at 18:47

George Osborne MP, Tatton voted to empower the Prime Minister to give notification of the United Kingdom's intention to leave the European Union.

The majority of MPs voted to empower the Prime Minister to give notification of the United Kingdom's intention to leave the European Union.

MPs were considering the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill[1]

The Bill's operative clause was titled: Power to notify withdrawal from the EU and stated:

  • (1) The Prime Minister may notify, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, the United Kingdom’s intention to withdraw from the EU.
  • (2) This section has effect despite any provision made by or under the European Communities Act 1972 or any other enactment.

MPs were discussing the motion:

  • That the Bill be now read a Second time.

The amendment rejected in this vote sought to replace the existing text so the motion would have become:

  • That this House
  • declines to give a Second Reading to the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill as the Government has set out no provision for effective consultation with the devolved administrations on implementing Article 50, has yet to publish a White Paper detailing the Government's policy proposals, has refused to give a guarantee on the position of EU nationals in the UK, has left unanswered a range of detailed questions covering many policy areas about the full implications of withdrawal from the single market and has provided no assurance that a future parliamentary vote will be anything other than irrelevant, as withdrawal from the European Union follows two years after the invoking of Article 50 if agreement is not reached in the forthcoming negotiations, unless they are prolonged by unanimity.”

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Debate in Parliament |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con319 (+2 tell) 1097.9%
DUP8 00100.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent0 30100.0%
Lab6 33017.0%
LDem0 7077.8%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 30100.0%
SNP0 50 (+2 tell)096.3%
UKIP1 00100.0%
UUP2 00100.0%
Total:336 100068.4%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Kenneth ClarkeRushcliffeConaye
Ian AustinDudley NorthLab (minister)no
Ronnie CampbellBlyth ValleyLabno
Frank FieldBirkenheadLab (minister)no
Kate HoeyVauxhallLab (minister)no
Rob MarrisWolverhampton South WestLab (minister)no
Graham StringerBlackley and BroughtonLab (minister)no

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