Finance (No. 2) Bill 2017 — Second Reading — 18 Apr 2017 at 21:19

John Baron MP, Basildon and Billericay did not vote.

The majority of MPs voted to raise the threshold for paying higher rate income tax, to introduce a Soft Drinks Industry Levy, to restrict the national insurance benefits of remuneration other than via salary and for other changes to the tax system.

MPs were considering a Finance Bill[1].

The motion supported by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That the Bill be now read a Second time.

The Bill:

  • imposes an income tax for the tax year 2017-18. (Parliament has to explicitly decide if to levy an income tax each year.[2])
  • keeps income tax rates unchanged for 2017-18 at a basic rate of 20%, higher rate of 40%; and additional rate applying to income over £150,000 per year of 45 (the "basic rate limit" was raised from £32,400 to £33,500 for 2016-16 in section 2 of the Finance Act 2016, consequently raising the higher rate threshold to £45,000, and section 3 of the Finance Act 2016 had raised the income tax free personal allowance to £11,500 for 2017-18].)
  • continues an exemption from income tax applying to the first £5,000 of savings interest.
  • reduces the nil rate applying to dividend income from £5,000 to £2,000 for tax year 2018 onwards.
  • does not change the rate of Corporation Tax for the financial year 2018 from that set at 19% via section 7 of the Finance (No 2) Act 2015.
  • establishes a new tax called the Soft Drinks Industry Levy; at rates of £0.24 per litre for drinks with at least 8 grams of sugars per 100ml; and £0.18 per litre for those with a lower sugar content.
  • removes the income tax relief and hence also the national insurance contributions relief which applied to the first £2,000 worth of employee shareholder shares, and also removes the capital gains tax exemption from such shares where an agreement was entered into on or after 1 December 2016.
  • restricts the national insurance benefits of "salary sacrifice arrangements" or "optional remuneration arrangements".
  • rises in taxes on alcohol and tobacco
  • makes no changes in fuel duties

The support for the second reading of the Bill enabled it to continue on its path to becoming law.

Debate in Parliament |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Con303 (+2 tell) 0092.4%
DUP7 0087.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent1 1066.7%
Lab0 177 (+2 tell)077.8%
LDem0 5055.6%
PC0 2066.7%
SDLP0 30100.0%
SNP0 47087.0%
UUP2 00100.0%
Total:313 236086.0%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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