European Union (Withdrawal) Bill — New Clause 11 — Rescinding of Notification of Withdrawal if no House of Commons Resolution Approving Either a Withdrawal Agreement or Withdrawal Without Agreement — 17 Jan 2018 at 16:30

Anna Soubry MP, Broxtowe voted to require the House of Commons to resolve either to approve an agreement relating to the UK's withdrawal from the EU, or to approve leaving without an agreement, and if neither resolution is passed for the notification of withdrawal to be rescinded.

The majority of MPs voted against requiring the House of Commons to resolve either to approve an agreement relating to the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union, or to approve leaving without an agreement, and if neither resolution is passed for the notification of withdrawal to be rescinded.

MPs were considering the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill[1].

The proposed new clause which was rejected in this vote was titled: "Meaningful vote on deal or no deal" and stated:

  • (1) The Prime Minister must publish and lay before both Houses of Parliament an assessment of the impact on the economy of the United Kingdom, and on each nation, province or region of the United Kingdom, of any unratified agreement between the United Kingdom and the EU under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union which sets out the arrangements for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU.
  • (2) Any agreement between the United Kingdom and the EU under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union which sets out the arrangements for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU may not be ratified unless—
  • (a) subsection (1) has been complied with,
  • (b) the House of Lords has considered a motion relating to the unratified agreement,
  • (c) the House of Commons has approved the unratified agreement by resolution,
  • (d) the statute mentioned in section 9 (approving the final terms of withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union) has been passed, and
  • (e) any other legislative provision to enable ratification has been passed or made.
  • (3) If no agreement has been reached by 31 December 2018 between the United Kingdom and the EU under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union setting out the arrangements for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU, the Prime Minister must publish and lay before both Houses of Parliament within one month an assessment of the impact on the economy of the United Kingdom, and on each nation, province or region of the United Kingdom, of leaving the EU under Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union without an agreement.
  • (4) If no agreement has been reached by 31 January 2019 between the United Kingdom and the EU under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union setting out the arrangements for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU,
  • (a) a Minister of the Crown must propose a motion in the House of Lords relating to the lack of an agreement, and
  • (b) a Minister of the Crown must propose a motion in the House of Commons approving the intention of the United Kingdom to leave the EU under Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union without a withdrawal agreement.
  • (5) Unless the House of Commons approves by resolution after 31 January 2019 the intention of the United Kingdom to leave the EU under Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union without a withdrawal agreement, the Prime Minister must either —
  • (a) reach an agreement before exit day between the United Kingdom and the EU under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union which sets out the arrangements for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU, or
  • (b) request the European Council for an extension of negotiation under Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union, or
  • (c) rescind the notice of intention under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union to withdraw from the EU given in accordance with the European Union (Notice of Withdrawal) Act 2017 and request the European Council to accept that rescission.”

The rejected new clause was accompanied by the following explanatory note:

  • This New Clause would ensure that the Government assesses the impact of either an agreement or no deal on the UK economy and regions before a meaningful vote, and that if Parliament does not agree to the agreement or to no deal, then the Government must request a revocation or extension of Article 50.

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Debate in Parliament |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con307 (+2 tell) 2098.1%
DUP10 00100.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent0 10100.0%
Lab3 249096.2%
LDem0 9 (+2 tell)091.7%
PC0 40100.0%
SNP0 350100.0%
Total:320 301097.4%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Kenneth ClarkeRushcliffeCon (front bench)aye
Anna SoubryBroxtoweConaye
Frank FieldBirkenheadLab (minister)no
Kate HoeyVauxhallLab (minister)no
Graham StringerBlackley and BroughtonLab (minister)no

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