Northern Ireland (Executive Formation and Exercise of Functions) Bill — Third Reading — 24 Oct 2018 at 19:01

The majority of MPs voted to extend the time period for within which Northern Ireland ministers can be appointed to run until at least 26 March 2019.

MPs were considering the Northern Ireland (Executive Formation and Exercise of Functions) Bill[1].

The background to the Bill was set out in the explanatory notes[2]:

  • There has been no functioning Northern Ireland Executive since 9 January 2017, when the then deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland resigned, which also resulted in the First Minister ceasing to hold office. All other Northern Ireland Ministers ceased to hold office when an extraordinary Assembly election was held on 2 March 2017. The period for the appointment of Ministers to form an Executive after that election was extended to 29 June 2017 by the Northern Ireland (Ministerial Appointments and Regional Rates) Act 2017 ("MARRA"), but no Ministers were appointed.

The Bill extends the time under section 16A of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 Act for Ministers to be appointed until 26 March 2019, with the possibility to further extend that period for up to 5 months with the agreement of Parliament.

The motion supported by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That the Bill be now read the Third time.

support for the Bill enabled it to continue on its path to becoming law.

Debate in Parliament |

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Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Con195 (+2 tell) 15 (+1 tell)067.2%
DUP0 8 (+1 tell)090.0%
Green1 00100.0%
Independent1 0033.3%
Lab138 3054.2%
LDem6 0050.0%
PC3 0075.0%
Total:344 26061.6%

Rebel Voters - sorted by vote

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
David AmessSouthend WestCon (front bench)no
Bob BlackmanHarrow EastCon (front bench)no
Peter BoneWellingboroughCon (front bench)no
Fiona BruceCongletonCon (front bench)tellno
Philip DaviesShipleyCon (front bench)no
Mary GlindonNorth TynesideLab (minister)no
Chris GreenBolton WestConno
John HayesSouth Holland and The DeepingsConno
Philip HolloboneKetteringCon (front bench)no
Stephen KerrStirlingCon (front bench)no
Edward LeighGainsboroughCon (front bench)no
Rachael MaskellYork CentralLab (minister)no
Fiona OnasanyaPeterboroughLab (minister)no
Mike PenningHemel HempsteadConno
Laurence RobertsonTewkesburyCon (front bench)no
Andrew RosindellRomfordCon (front bench)no
Desmond SwayneNew Forest WestCon (front bench)no
Ross ThomsonAberdeen SouthCon (front bench)no
Martin VickersCleethorpesCon (front bench)no

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