Craig Whittaker MP, Calder Valley

voted strongly for the policy

Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For

by scoring 84.2% compared to the votes below

Someone who believes that Another referendum on membership of the European Union should be held would cast votes described by the policy.

European Union Bill — New Clause 11 — Referendum on EU Membership If Referendum Opposes Transfer of Powers - 1 Feb 2011 - Division No. 186
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye (strong)
Craig WhittakerNo
Con18250
Lab40
LDem043
Total28297

The majority of MPs voted against a proposal that if a proposed transfer of powers from the UK to the EU was rejected in a referendum a subsequent, binding, referendum ought be held on the UK's membership of the EU.

MPs were debating the European Union Bill[1]. The text of the clause MPs rejected was:

  • In order to meet the referendum condition referred to in section 2, section 3 and section 6 of this Act, the Act providing for the approval of-
  • (a) a treaty under the terms of section 2; or
  • (b) a decision under the terms of section 3; or
  • (c) a decision or draft decision under section 6
  • shall also provide for a further binding referendum to be held on continuing United Kingdom membership of the European Union, if the majority of those voting in a referendum held under the terms of the relevant section are opposed to the ratification of the treaty, decision or draft decision, as the case may be

==

National Referendum on the United Kingdom's Membership of the European Union - 24 Oct 2011 - Division No. 372
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye (strong)
Craig WhittakerAye
Con79208
Lab19216
LDem150
Total111483

The majority of MPs voted against a proposal to call upon the Government to hold a referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union.

The defeated motion was moved by David Nuttall MP[1], it read:

  • That this House
  • calls upon the Government to introduce a Bill in the next session of Parliament to provide for the holding of a national referendum on whether the United Kingdom should
  • (a) remain a member of the European Union on the current terms;
  • (b) leave the European Union; or
  • (c) re-negotiate the terms of its membership in order to create a new relationship based on trade and co-operation.

Despite the majority of MPs not supporting this motion Parliament did eventually consider a European Union (Referendum) Bill introduced as a private members bill by James Wharton MP[2].

Queen's Speech — EU Referendum - 15 May 2013 - Division No. 3
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye
Craig WhittakerAye
Con1141
Lab11220
LDem146
Total133280

The majority of MPs voted not to express regret that the Government had not included proposals for a referendum on the UK's membership of the EU in their legislative programme.

The proposed text which MPs decided not to include in their response to the Queen's speech was:

  • "but respectfully regret that an EU referendum bill was not included in the Gracious Speech."

European Union (Referendum) Bill — Second Reading - 5 Jul 2013 - Division No. 45
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye (strong)
Craig WhittakerAye
Con2930
Lab60
LDem00
Total3062

The majority of MPs voted in favour of holding a referendum on the UK's membership of the European Union before the end of 2017.

The referendum question included in the bill is:

  • "Do you think that the United Kingdom should be a member of the European Union?"

The vote was on the second reading of the European Union (Referendum) Bill[1]. The bill requires a referendum to take place and includes arrangements for it, a vote in favour of a second reading can be seen as support for the general principle of the bill (opportunities to amend the details follow). The motion MPs technically voted on was:

"That the Bill be now read a Second time"

European Union (Referendum) Bill — Clause 1 — Referendum on the UK's Membership of the EU on 23 October 2014 - 22 Nov 2013 - Division No. 134
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye
Craig WhittakerNo
Con14246
Lab11
LDem02
Total17251

The majority of MPs voted against a proposal to hold a referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union on the 23rd of October 2014.

The rejected amendment was proposed by Adam Afriyie MP and stated[2]:

  • "page 1, line 4, leave out ‘before 31 December 2017’ and insert ‘on 23 October 2014’

The European Union (Referendum) Bill[1] remained unchanged and continued to require a referendum be held before 31 December 2017.

European Union (Referendum) Bill - 17 Oct 2014 - Division No. 58
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye (strong)
Craig WhittakerAye
Con2760
Lab40
LDem10
Total2852

The majority of MPs voted for a referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union to be held before 31 December 2017.

The motion supported by the majority of MPs taking part in the vote was:

  • That the Bill be now read a Second time.

The subject of the motion was the European Union (Referendum) Bill[1][2], the support of the majority of MPs at its second reading allowed it to continue on its path to becoming law.

European Union Referendum Bill — Decline Second Reading - 9 Jun 2015 - Division No. 5
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'No (strong)
Craig WhittakerNo
Con0322
Lab03
LDem04
Total61341

The majority of MPs voted in favour of a referendum, to be held before the end of 2017, on whether the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union.

MPs were considering the European Union Referendum Bill[1]

The motion being considered was:

  • That the Bill be now read a Second time.

In this vote an amendment which would have replaced the text of the motion was rejected. The rejected text stated:

  • That this House
  • declines to give a Second Reading to the EU Referendum Bill because it fails to meet the gold standard set by the Scottish independence referendum in terms of inclusivity and democratic participation, in particular because the Bill does not give the right to vote to 16 and 17 year olds or most EU nationals living in the UK, the Bill does not include a double majority provision to ensure that no nation or jurisdiction of the UK can be taken out of the EU against its will, and the legislation does not include provision to ensure that the referendum vote cannot be held on the same day as the Scottish, Welsh or Northern Ireland elections.

Had the amended motion been passed the Bill would have made no further progress towards becoming law.

European Union Referendum Bill — Second Reading - 9 Jun 2015 - Division No. 6
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye (strong)
Craig WhittakerAye
Con3200
Lab2060
LDem70
Total54655

The majority of MPs voted in favour of a referendum, to be held before the end of 2017, on whether the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union.

MPs were considering the European Union Referendum Bill[1]

The motion supported by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That the Bill be now read a Second time.

The support for the motion means the Bill can continue on its path to becoming law.

European Union Referendum Bill — Third Reading - 7 Sep 2015 - Division No. 61
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye (strong)
Craig WhittakerAye
Con2850
Lab201
LDem00
Total31855

The majority of MPs voted for a referendum to be held on whether the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union.

MPs were considering the European Union Referendum Bill.[1]

The Bill provided for a referendum to be held before 31 December 2017 and set the question for the referendum as being:

  • “Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union?”

The motion supported by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That the Bill be now read the Third time.

The support of the majority of MPs meant this Bill could continue on the path towards becoming law.

Referendum on the UK's Membership of the European Union — Dates - 29 Feb 2016 - Division No. 201
Policy 'Referendum on the UK's membership of the EU - For'Aye
Craig WhittakerAye
Con2830
Lab1812
LDem60
Total47357

The majority of MPs voted to set the date of the referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union as the 23rd of June 2016, and to set other dates relevant to the regulation of the referendum.

The motion approved by the majority of MPs taking part in this vote was:

The regulations set the date of the referendum on if the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union as 23rd June 2016. (The European Union Referendum Act 2015 required the referendum be held before 31 December 2017).

The regulations also set[1]:

  • the start date of the "referendum period" as the 15th of April 2016. This is generally the date from which spending is regulated, with some exceptions. The regulations also set the dates for reporting periods, and dates for reporting donations, loans and similar to permitted participants.
  • the date of the start of the referendum period, relevant for calculating the application deadline for to become a designated organisation to which public funding is available, as the 4th of March 2016. Under section 109 of the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000 applications have to be made within 28 days of that date.[2]

==

How the number is calculated

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, no points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, no points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Questions about this formula can be discussed on the forum.

No of votesPointsOut of
Most important votes (50 points)   
MP voted with policy6300300
MP voted against policy1050
MP absent000
Less important votes (10 points)   
MP voted with policy22020
MP voted against policy1010
Less important absentees (2 points)   
MP absent*000
Total:320380

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Lords are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

agreement score
MP's points
total points
 = 
320
380
 = 84.2 %.


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