International Development (Official Development Assistance Target) Bill — New Clause 7 — Referendum on Development Aid Target — Target only Applying When UK Has Budget Surplus — 5 Dec 2014 at 11:45

The majority of MPs voted against requiring the approval of the majority of voters in a referendum before setting a target of at least 0.7% of national income being spent on international aid. The majority of MPs were also voting against only making the target apply in years where the United Kingdom records a budget surplus.

MPs were considering the International Development (Official Development Assistance Target) Bill[1]. The Bill provides for a target of at least 0.7% of national income being spent on international aid and includes arrangements for evaluation of that aid spending.

The proposed new clause rejected in this vote stated:

  • (1) This Act shall come into force on such a day appointed by the Secretary of State by an order contained in a statutory instrument.
  • (2) An order under subsection (1) shall not be made unless a referendum has taken place in the United Kingdom and more than 50% of those casting a vote do so in favour of meeting the target.
  • (3) This Act shall only have effect in those years where the United Kingdom records a budget surplus.
  • (4) The Secretary of State may vary the target mentioned in section 1 by an order contained in a statutory instrument in response to the UK leaving or joining a multilateral organisation which itself disburses ODA.
  • (5) This Act shall expire on the anniversary of its coming into force in the fifth year of its being so in force.

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Debate in Parliament | Source |

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Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Alliance1 00100.0%
Con37 3 (+2 tell)013.9%
Green1 00100.0%
Independent1 0050.0%
Lab78 (+1 tell) 0030.6%
LDem24 (+1 tell) 0044.6%
SNP3 0050.0%
UKIP0 1050.0%
Total:145 4024.3%

Rebel Voters - sorted by vote

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Christopher ChopeChristchurchContellaye
Philip DaviesShipleyConaye
Philip HolloboneKetteringConaye
David NuttallBury NorthContellaye
Jacob Rees-MoggNorth East SomersetConaye

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