Queen's Speech — Programme for Government — National Health Service — 23 Oct 2019 at 18:50

The majority of MPs voted to continue to empower GPs to commission services, retain a strong Care Quality Commission, to retain Healthwatch England, and not to reverse a decision to seek to cut admin costs for example by abolishing Primary Care Trusts.

The debate on the content of the government's legislative programme outlined in the Queens' speech is technically, and traditionally, on the subject of a message of thanks which the house is to send the monarch for making the speech.

MPs were considering the motion:

  • That an Humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, as follows:
  • Most Gracious Sovereign,
  • We, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Majesty for the Gracious Speech which Your Majesty has addressed to both Houses of Parliament.

the amendment rejected in this vote was:

  • at the end of the Question to add:
  • “but respectfully regrets that the Gracious Speech does not repeal the Health and Social Care Act 2012 to restore a publicly provided and administered National Health Service and protect it from future trade agreements that would allow private companies competing for services who put profit before public health and that could restrict policy decisions taken in the public interest.”

The Health and Social Care Act[1]:

  • established an independent NHS Board to allocate resources and provide commissioning guidance
  • increased GPs’ powers to commission services on behalf of their patients
  • strengthened the role of the Care Quality Commission
  • developed Monitor, the body that currently regulates NHS foundation trusts, into an economic regulator to oversee aspects of access and competition in the NHS
  • cut the number of health bodies to help meet the Government's commitment to cut NHS administration costs by a third, including abolishing Primary Care Trusts and Strategic Health Authorities.
  • established Healthwatch England.
  • [1] Parliament's webpage on the Health and Social Care Act 2012

Debate in Parliament |

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Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Con282 (+2 tell) 0098.3%
DUP10 00100.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent18 7061.0%
Lab0 235 (+2 tell)096.0%
LDem0 000.0%
PC0 40100.0%
SNP0 350100.0%
Total:310 282092.8%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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