European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill — Second Reading — 20 Dec 2019 at 14:03

The majority of MPs voted to implement the withdrawal agreement agreed between the United Kingdom and the European Union which includes an implementation period running until 31 December 2020 during which European Union laws and treaties would generally continue to have effect in United Kingdom law.

MPs were considering the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill[1][2].

The Bill:

  • *provides for the treaties of the European Union, and European Union derived law, to generally continue to have effect in United Kingdom law following the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the union until the end of an "implementation period" ending on 31 December 2020 as set in the Withdrawal Agreement of October 2019[3].
  • *gives legal effect to the Withdrawal Agreement[3] in UK law.
  • *implements agreements with Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland on retaining citizen's rights.
  • *empowers ministers to make immigration regulations in line with the Withdrawal Agreement with the European and the agreements with Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.
  • *empowers ministers to make other regulations in connection with the implementation of the Withdrawal Agreement and connected documents including on the recognition of professional qualifications, the implementation of agreements on co-ordination of social security systems and the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland.
  • *provides a right of appeal to the courts in connection with immigration status decisions connected with withdrawal.
  • *establishes an independent authority to monitor the implementation and application of the agreements covering citizens' rights.
  • *ensures the arrangements relating to co-operation between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland set out in The Good Friday Agreement or Belfast Agreement are retained.

The motion supported by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

Debate in Parliament |

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Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Alliance0 10100.0%
Con353 (+2 tell) 0097.3%
DUP0 7087.5%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent0 10100.0%
Lab6 162 (+2 tell)084.2%
LDem0 110100.0%
PC0 40100.0%
SDLP0 20100.0%
SNP0 45095.7%
Total:359 234093.0%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Sarah ChampionRotherhamLabaye
Rosie CooperWest LancashireLabaye
Jon CruddasDagenham and RainhamLabaye
Emma Lewell-BuckSouth ShieldsLabaye
Grahame MorrisEasingtonLabaye
Toby PerkinsChesterfieldLabaye

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