Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill — New Clause — Time Limit on Immigration Detention for EEA and Swiss Nationals — 19 Oct 2020 at 21:15

The majority of MPs voted against introducing a time limit on immigration detention of twenty-eight days for nationals of the European Economic Area and Switzerland.

MPs were considering the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill.[1][2]

The motion supported by a majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That this House disagrees with Lords amendment 6

Lords amendment 6[3] stated:

  • Insert the following new Clause—
  • Time limit on immigration detention for EEA and Swiss nationals
  • (1) For the purpose of this section, a person (“P”) is defined as any person who, immediately before the commencement of Schedule 1, was—
  • (a) residing in the United Kingdom in accordance with the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016 (SI 2016/1052);
  • (b) residing in the United Kingdom in accordance with a right conferred by or under any of the other instruments which is repealed by Schedule 1; or
  • (c) otherwise residing in the United Kingdom in accordance with any right derived from European Union law which continues, by virtue of section 4 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (saving for rights etc. under section 2(1) of the ECA), to be recognised and available in domestic law after exit day.
  • (2) The Secretary of State may not detain P under a relevant detention power for a period of more than 28 days from the relevant time.
  • ...

The rejected new clause also included:

  • (6) This section does not apply to a person in respect of whom the Secretary of State has certified that the decision to detain is or was taken in the interests of national security

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Debate in Parliament |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Alliance0 10100.0%
Con326 (+2 tell) 4091.2%
DUP0 4050.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent1 30100.0%
Lab0 189094.0%
LDem0 9 (+2 tell)0100.0%
PC0 30100.0%
SDLP0 20100.0%
SNP0 46097.9%
Total:327 262092.4%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
Rehman ChishtiGillingham and RainhamConno
David DavisHaltemprice and HowdenConno
Tim LoughtonEast Worthing and ShorehamCon (front bench)no
William WraggHazel GroveCon (front bench)no

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