European Union (Future Relationship) Bill — Timetable and Procedural Rules — 30 Dec 2020 at 09:41

The majority of MPs voted against allocating up to around seven additional hours of time in the House of Commons for consideration of the implementation in United Kingdom law of agreements made between the United Kingdom and the European Union.

MPs were considering a timetable for their consideration of the

European Union (Future Relationship) Bill[1][2].

The minister proposing the timetable and procedural rules explained:

  • It ensures that the Bill can be passed today, that the statutory instruments can be laid tomorrow and that we can therefore be compliant with our responsibility in terms of our international agreements by the end of the year.[3]

The proposed timetable and procedural rules contained a section stating:

  • (c) Proceedings on Second Reading, proceedings in Committee of the whole House, any proceedings on Consideration and proceedings on Third Reading shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion at 2.30pm

The amendment rejected in this vote was:

  • Amendment (a), in line 10, paragraph 1, leave out sub-paragraph (c) and insert —
  • “(c) Proceedings on Second Reading shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion five hours after the beginning of those proceedings; and proceedings in Committee of the whole House, any proceedings on Consideration and proceedings on Third Reading shall (so far as not previously concluded) be brought to a conclusion no later than seven hours after the beginning of proceedings on second reading.”

If the Bill had not passed by the end of the year the United Kingdom would have left the European Union without agreements made between the United Kingdom would have left the European Union having been implemented in law in the United Kingdom.[2]

This vote was held at 9.41am.[4]

Debate in Parliament |

Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (No)Minority (Aye)BothTurnout
Alliance0 10100.0%
Con353 (+2 tell) 1097.8%
DUP8 00100.0%
Independent1 2060.0%
Lab0 000.0%
LDem0 110100.0%
SDLP0 1050.0%
SNP0 44 (+2 tell)097.9%
Total:362 60066.8%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
William WraggHazel GroveCon (front bench)aye

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