European Union (Withdrawal) Bill — New Clause — Maintenance of EU Environmental Principles and Standards — 13 Jun 2018 at 19:43

The majority of MPs voted against steps designed to ensure that the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union does not result in the removal or diminution of any rights, powers, liabilities, obligations, restrictions, remedies and procedures that contribute to the protection and improvement of the environment.

MPs were considering the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill[1].

The motion supported by the majority of MPs in this vote was:

  • That this House disagrees with Lords amendment 3

Lords amendment 3[2] sought to add a new clause titled: Maintenance of EU environmental principles and standards stating:

  • (1) The Secretary of State must take steps designed to ensure that the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU does not result in the removal or diminution of any rights, powers, liabilities, obligations, restrictions, remedies and procedures that contribute to the protection and improvement of the environment.
  • (2) In particular, the Secretary of State must carry out the activities required by subsections (3) to (5) within the period of six months beginning with the date on which this Act is passed.
  • (3) The Secretary of State must publish proposals for primary legislation to establish a duty on public authorities to apply principles of environmental law established in EU law or on which EU environmental law is based in the exercise of relevant functions after exit day.
  • (4) The Secretary of State must publish proposals for primary legislation to establish an independent body with the purpose of ensuring compliance with environmental law by public authorities.
  • (5) The Secretary of State must publish—
  • (a) a list of statutory functions that can be exercised so as to achieve the objective in subsection (1); and
  • (b) a list of functions currently exercised by EU bodies that require to be retained or replicated in UK law in order to achieve the objective in subsection (1).
  • (6) The Secretary of State must before 1 January 2020 lay before Parliament a Statement of Environmental Policy which sets out how the principles in subsection (7) will be given effect.
  • (7) The principles referred to in subsection (3) include—
  • (a) the precautionary principle as it relates to the environment,
  • (b) the principle of preventive action to avert environmental damage,
  • (c) the principle that environmental damage should as a priority be rectified at source,
  • (d) the polluter pays principle,
  • (e) sustainable development,
  • (f) prudent and rational utilisation of natural resources,
  • (g) public access to environmental information,
  • (h) public participation in environmental decision making, and
  • (i) access to justice in relation to environmental matters.
  • (8) Before complying with subsections (3) to (6) the Secretary of State must consult—
  • (a) each of the devolved administrations;
  • (b) persons appearing to represent the interests of local government;
  • (c) persons appearing to represent environmental interests;
  • (d) farmers and land managers; and
  • (e) such other persons as the Secretary of State thinks appropriate.”

The explanatory notes to the rejected new clause[3] stated:

  • Lords Amendment 3 would require the UK Government to take steps to ensure that environmental protection and improvement is not reduced as a result of leaving the EU. In particular, it would require the UK Government to publish within six months of this Act being passed:
  • a. proposals for primary legislation establishing a duty on public authorities to apply environmental principles after exit day;
  • b. proposals for the establishment before exit day of an independent body to ensure compliance with environmental law; and
  • c. a list of statutory functions that can be exercised so as to achieve the objective in subsection (1) (not reducing environmental protection) and a list of functions currently exercised by EU bodies that must be retained or replicated in UK law in order to ensure that environmental protection is not reduced as a result of EU exit.

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Debate in Parliament |

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Party Summary

Votes by party, red entries are votes against the majority for that party.

What is Tell? '+1 tell' means that in addition one member of that party was a teller for that division lobby.

What are Boths? An MP can vote both aye and no in the same division. The boths page explains this.

What is Turnout? This is measured against the total membership of the party at the time of the vote.

PartyMajority (Aye)Minority (No)BothTurnout
Con310 (+2 tell) 0098.4%
DUP10 00100.0%
Green0 10100.0%
Independent0 20100.0%
Lab0 244 (+2 tell)094.6%
LDem0 120100.0%
PC0 40100.0%
SNP0 33094.3%
Total:320 296096.7%

Rebel Voters - sorted by party

MPs for which their vote in this division differed from the majority vote of their party. You can see all votes in this division, or every eligible MP who could have voted in this division

Sort by: Name | Constituency | Party | Vote

NameConstituencyPartyVote
no rebellions

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